Ian D’Sa

Ian D’Sa

Billy Talent | Guitars

this is a beautiful sounding (and looking:) mic! Love the design!

Hey Walter, this is a beautiful sounding (and looking:) mic! Love the design! I’ve yet to fiddle around with the polar patterns and Db boost but vocals are sounding very nice right out of the box, well done!

I’ve been using the 818 over the last month for vocals, it has a great amount of body like the 414 but a more noticeable top end that’s silky and smooth.
I’ve tried it through Neve 5052’s, 1081’s, and the classic 1073 (which I find it really sings). Beautiful mic and my go-to right now. 

For Billy Talent, the period following the release of their fourth album, Dead Silence, in 2012 was one of celebration. The momentum generated by that album’s string of Top 10 Juno Award–nominated singles carried through to the 10th-anniversary festivities for the band’s 2003 debut. Following this victory lap, the band could approach sessions for their fifth album from a position of strength, emboldened by all they’ve accomplished and eager to embark upon the next phase of their career.

On January 15, drummer Aaron Solowoniuk took to the band’s YouTube channel to explain that he would not be playing on Billy Talent’s new album. This would be a significant setback for any band, but it was especially devastating for Billy Talent, the rare group that have kept their original line-up intact for over 20 years. Kowalewicz, Solowoniuk, guitarist Ian D’Sa, and bassist Jonathan Gallant have been best buds since childhood—losing Aaron was like losing a limb.

“It was one of the hardest things we’ve had to deal with as a band,” says D’Sa, who’s also the band’s chief songwriter and producer. “To think of what he has to do when he goes onstage every night, it’s insane, for a guy living with MS. And for the past 15 years or so, he’s trucked through that and beat it. But I guess we all knew that one day it could relapse, and it just happened right before we were going into the studio.”

billytalent.com

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